INDIeFLIX Launch

Now, we are thrilled and proud to say Daughter has just been released on IndieFlix!

The indie filmmakers behind Daughter first heard about IndieFlix through an interview with founder Scilla Andreen on the Indie Film Hustle Podcast, and were excited to learn just how and why this US platform gives back to indie filmmakers and keen to join ourselves. 

IndieFlix is run by filmmakers, so they get it – unlike Amazon, IndieFlix pay filmmakers for every minute their movie is watched so it is a win-win model that increases the filmmaker’s payout as the company expands.

With all of Daughters success, NPG look forward to what is still to come.

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Enjoy watching Daughter though Indieflix and support indie filmmakers.

16 Days of Activism

Daughter has been selected to screen and take part in Wodonga Council’s annual event 16 Days of Activism, with the film screening at Wodonga library on November 28th along with two other films, Lipstick (Directed by Harriet McKern, 1994) and Footy Chicks (Directed by Rebecca Barry, 2006).

The Facebook event reads, “Join us for a selection of films that explore a range of topics that face women on a day to day basis – from safety on the streets, how they look, what they wear, how this is viewed and judged by society and who they sleep with and why.”

Thanks to BeamaFilm is in order, as the Wodonga Council found Daughter from their website.

The event is free of charge, suitable for 18+ age range and booking a place is suggested. See further details such as time and address on the official Facebook Event.




Daughter & Fan-Force

Daughter and Fan-Force joined forces just over a year ago and thus far it has been a slow start for the film as it finds it's way on this wonderful platform.

With Sarah Jayne's production company NPG moving to Europe in the coming months, the possibilities for a Daughter International Tour are strong as Fan- Force has expanded from Australia to International. Daughter fans can now host screenings of the film in the UK, USA, Germany, Ireland, Canada and New Zealand.

For those unfamiliar with Fan-Force and what the company is all about, it is quite simple. Fan-Force is an online library of films and the fun part is, Fan-Force allows fans to choose the films they want to see and host screenings at a cinema in their local area.

Better yet, it is very exciting and rewarding for independent filmmakers to have this platform, as it can be time consuming and financially difficult to secure and set up a screening for your film. Film festivals can also be costly and there is no guarantee that your film will be chosen to screen, thus no one sees your film and you are left out of pocket and disheartened.

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Fan-Force works on a tipping point basis, meaning if the fans don't gather and book, the screening does not go ahead, so no-one is out of pocket. But the aim of the game is to invite your friends, community group, school clubs and family to reach that tipping point and beyond. Fan-Force will help along the way, deal with booking the cinema and give you promotional options if needed.

To host your own Daughter Fan-Force screening go directly to the Daughter Fan-Force page here - Daughter on Fan-Force

Encore Screening @ 4Dverse Continues Discussion

Last nights encore screening at 4Dverse on Carlisle St Kilda was another success for this tough little social justice film, proving that Daughter is still a much needed part of the discussion gendered violence and victim blaming in our communities.

Guest speakers Wendy Squires and Anne Riggs touched on important matters to do with community violence, perceptions of women in our society and how victims are taking back control of their lives.  

Wendy, a St Kilda local, writer and journalist was one of the first people in the media to see the problem with how Tracy Connelly's murder coverage was wrongfully portraying the victim and her speech last night gave a very personal insight into how loosing a friend through gendered violence is very much something to be discussed. No matter what the persons choice of work, respect is more important than comparing one victim to another based on this choice. 

Anne Riggs, visual artist and one of the founders of Arts in Community International knows how challenging it is for women she works with on arts projects to come to terms with the violence they have experienced. Anne spoke about some projects in particular and explained the reasons behind the pieces shown on a powerpoint presentation and she discussed the effects of violence and how she helps to heal through her art. 

SJ opening the night

 

Both speeches made for a perfect lead in for the two films which followed, Force and Daughter. Scott Blease's Force, is a ten minute short film which shows family violence from the point of view of a young boy who is trying to escape the reality of an abusive home through his imagination and interest in superhero movies. Force made for a great lead in film and all but 1 cast and crew member were in attendance to answer questions through a short Q&A. 

Daughter was once again received well by the audience, which this time around seemed to be an older demographic. The crowd was intimate, estimated at around 50 people max and we almost filled all the seats at 4Dverse. As the director of Daughter, I was very pleased with the outcome. I have now had further requests by those who once again could not make it to this encore screening, however at this stage I am unsure if I will screen Daughter to the public once more or just move straight into a full fledged school tour as planned.

4Dverse as a venue and new art and wellbeing space was such a perfect venue for this screening.  Founded by Victor Holder this community space caters for all functions and events and is always open to discussing ideas. Victor had the bar and door under control and even found time to light the open fire to keep us warm. Teamed up with Vegilicious once again, who supplied NPG with some winter warming soup for everyone , this night felt complete.

I keep getting surprised by the audience and the attraction to my film and I must say that this screenings Q&A, despite being nervous ,was one of the best I have ever taken part in. I could not have asked for a better night and once again, it went so quick and ended too soon. 

Check out the photos under the gallery. 

A Very Special St Kilda Event

It has been more than a couple of weeks now since the premiere screening of my film, Daughter at St Kilda Town Hall on March 10th and I still can't believe how wonderful and special the event was. I feel totally blessed to have had such a well received film and a huge turnout, that was three times bigger than I expected. We estimate 180 people were in attendance. The continued support for Daughter and what the project stands for continues to make me smile. 

This time last year I was still researching the topics and reading up on as many news stories on Tracy, Jill , sex work in St Kilda and the topic of Gendered Violence I could. My meeting with Sally from St Kilda Gatehouse in January was a success and the next step was to finish up the script. It was real now, we were to shoot during the first week of September. To get to this stage, the premiere screening and still be supported by the St Kilda community, the general public and local businesses is amazing beyond words. But now during National Women's week 2016- how much has changed for Daughter. 

On the night Deputy Mayor of Port Phillip Serge Thomann, who has supported the project from his first discussion with me and through Pozible, opened the proceedings and gave a speech which summed up the context of the film and it's connection of Port Phillip -

"Port Philip has got a very strong commitment for social justice and through the the Cultural Development Grant, we are proud to help and support this project. This is a short film that will hopefully make a difference and open peoples minds and start conversations that are sometimes hard to have." 

Serge Thomann opening the event with a heart warming speech

 

So many other influential speakers, such as Andie Patchett from the St Kilda Gatehouse, Elliott Costello from Polished Man and Heavy METAL representatives Tanya Giles and David Nugent graced the stage before the film and I enjoyed talking to everyone after the screening. 

So many happy faces were seen in the crowd and this showed through in the photos taken by Raphael Chan, our BTS photographer and sponsor. But to truly understand just how warm the energy was and how proud we stood together in St Kilda Town Hall, during National Women's Week on March 10th, in solidarity against victim blaming and gendered violence in society at the screening you had to be there. It can't be described through words.  

Stay tuned for further screenings, announced here through the blogs and on the EVENTS page.